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  • Detained in Dubai

FIFA2022’s host country Qatar told “Free Trapped British Nationals”, detained 73 year old speaks out

Gross human rights violations hidden by UK politicians. British nationals trapped or jailed in Qatar’s desert prison have received little concern from British government.


Exhausted Ranald Crook, stuck in Doha with no end in sight.

73 year old Gloucestershire resident Ranald Crook and his family excitedly decided to relocate to Qatar in 2005 but little did they know, this endeavour would leave him separated from his family, his children, absent at his father’s death; stuck in the desert facing lifelong captivity and possible incarceration in Doha’s notorious central prison.

Qatar’s ambition has been steadily growing over the past decade, and especially since the Saudi led blockade, the country has increased its competitiveness in the propaganda war that has plagued the region; investing into universities, news and media outlets, think tanks and business commerce groups. With this vigorous effort, the country has managed to attract entrepreneurs, investors and development, including Doha becoming a major transit hub.


Like the UAE has exemplified, like future Saudi Arabia will, there is a colossal difference between what is marketed to expats and tourists and what reality is on the ground. It is this unspoken discrepancy that has led to the downfall of so many expat entrepreneurs in the Gulf.


While Qatar has made complaints to the International Criminal Court in respect of human rights violations during the blockade, it has also been the subject of criticisms for violations against migrant workers after winning the bid for FIFA 2022. Qatar was commended by human rights organisations for the improvements they made to worker conditions. Overlooked, however, are professional expatriates who bring their skills and funding to Qatar to improve the country, its image, economy and international standing, only to find themselves abused, robbed and behind bars wondering what went wrong.